GAD

  • Gender and Development

    BICOL UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT

    GAD MANDATES

    • Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW)
    • Beijing Platform for Action (BPFA)
    • Republic Act No. 9710 (Magna Carta of Women) and its Implementing Rules and Regulations
    • Joint Circular No. 2012-01 from the Philippine Commission on Women, National Economic and Development Authority and the Department of Budget and Management: Annual Planning and Budgeting Guidelines
    • CHED Memorandum No 1, Series of 2015
    • Civil Service Commission Resolution No. 01-0940: Administrative Disciplinary Rules on Sexual Harassment Cases

    The GAD perspective of the BU vision is:

    • A Gender Responsive University Producing Leaders and Change Agents for Social Change and Development

    Bicol University’s GAD goals are:

    • To mainstream gender equality principles and perspectives in instruction, student services, research and extension;
    • To develop and implement plans, programs, and activities (PPAs) that will advance gender equality in the University;
    • To promote GAD sensitivity and awareness within Bicol University through trainings, workshops and seminars;
    • To integrate the principle of gender equality in the conduct of research and in the delivery of extension services to the community.
    • To establish sustainable partnerships and foster cooperation with networks and advocates within and outside of Bicol University to promote a gender responsive society.

    GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT AGENDA

    GAD Capability Building

    • GAD Planning and Budgeting
    • Gender Analysis/Gender Audit Tools
    • Gender Awareness and Sensitivity
    • Anti-Sexual Harassment

    GAD in Instruction, Student Services, Research and Extension

    • Integration of GAD concept in the Curriculum/ Syllabi/Research/Extension
    • Conduct of Research on issues concerning women/ GAD
    • Use of Gender-Fair Language
    • Gender Responsive Counselling
    • Committee on Decorum and Investigation on Sexual Harassment Cases

    GAD Information Dissemination, Advocacies and Data Generation

    • Publication and Documentation
    • Forum Discussion on women’s and gender issues
    • Anti-Sexual Harassment Seminar
    • Support to end Violence-Against-Women (VAWC)
    • Support to the Filipino Family

    GAD Policy Initiatives/Change

    • Equal Opportunity in Employment and Scholarships
    • Non-Discrimination of Pregnant Students, Faculty and Employees
    • Gender Fair Courses
    • Equal opportunity in enrollment in curricular programs.
  • Functions and Duties

    The GAD Focal Point System of the University shall perform the following functions:

    1. Lead in the mainstreaming gender perspective in agency/department policies, plans and programs. In the process, they shall ensure the assessment of the gender-responsiveness of systems, structures, policies, programs, processes and procedures of the agency based on the priority needs and concerns of constituencies and employees and the formulation of recommendation including their implementation;
    2. Lead in setting up appropriate systems and mechanisms to ensure the generation, processing, review and updating of sex-disaggregated data or GAD database to serve as basis in performance-based gender responsive planning;
    3. Coordinate efforts of different divisions, offices, units of the agency and advocate for the integration of GAD perspectives in all their systems and processes;
    4. Spearhead the preparation of the agency annual performance-based GAD Plans, Programs and Budget in response to gender issues of their constituencies and clients and in the context of their agency mandate, and consolidate the same following the format and procedure prescribed by the PCW, DBM and NEDA in the Joint Circular 2012-1. The GFPS shall likewise be responsible for submitting the consolidated GAD Plans and Budgets of the department/agency, and as needed, in responding to PCW’s comments or requests for additional information;
    5. Lead in monitoring the effective implementation of GAD-related policies and the annual GAD Plans, Programs and Budget;
    6. Lead the preparation and consolidation of the annual agency GAD Accomplishment Report and other GAD reports that may be required under the MCW;
    7. Strengthen the external link with other agencies or organizations working on women’s rights and gender and development to harmonize and synchronize GD efforts at various levels of governance;
    8. Promote and actively pursue the participation of women and gender advocates, other civil society groups and private organizations in the various stages of the development planning cycle, giving special attention to the marginalized sectors; and
    9. Ensure that all personnel of the agency including the finance officers are capacitated on GAD. Along this line, the GFPS will recommend and plan an appropriate capacity development program on gender and development for its employees as part of and implemented under its regular resource development program.
  • Region V Council of GAD focal holds convergence meeting

    Bicol University through its Center for Gender and Development hosted the Region V Council of Gender and Development convergence meeting held on August 6, 2018 at the CTE Hall of the BU College of Education. Hon. Cristitata Cervantes Triunfante, Philippine Commission of Women (PCW) Commissioner for Education and Alternate GAD Focal Dr. Jean Salalima of the Commission on Higher Education (CHED) Region V Office joined the Council officers as resource persons.

    PCW Commissioner Triunfante said, “The GAD directions for Education is provided in the Gender Equality and Women Empowerment Plan (GEWE) and the Philippine Plan for Gender and Development (PPGD) crafted in 1995 and to end in 2015.”

    “During the Aquino Administration, there was the Women’s Empowerment, Development and Gender Equality (WEDGE) Plan and now for the current administration, the women’s agenda is expected to be enshrined in the GEWE Plan which will be disseminated later this year. PCW conducted a nationwide stakeholders’ consultations for Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment (GEWE) Plan in 2017,” said Comm. Triunfante.

    The GEWE Plan is expected to concretize the Philippine Government’s commitment to fully implement RA 9710 or the Magna Carta of Women (MCW). Guided by Ambisyon Natin 2040 and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) particularly Goal No. 5 on achieving gender equality, and the empowerment of all women and girls, the GEWE plan is also expected concretize the gender-responsive provisions of the Philippine Development Plan for 2017-2022.

    “The GEWE Plan focuses on the strategic goal areas of Gender-Responsive Social Development, Gender-responsive Economic Development, Gender-Responsive Participatory Governance, Gender in Justice, Security and Peace, Gender in the Environment and Climate Change, Gender-Responsive  Infrastructure and Technology and Transforming Gender Norms and Culture,” reveals Comm. Triunfante.

    “The GEWE Plan is expected to have a compendium of indicators which can be used in the planning, monitoring and evaluation of our GAD activities so when we craft our Regional GAD Agenda, we can use the GEWE Plan as our guide,” Comm. Triunfante further elaborates. The GEWE Plan, once finalized and disseminated shall serve as a guide for formulating Gender and Development (GAD) Plans and Budgets of national agencies, local government units, higher education institutions, and the gender-responsive government policies, plans and projects.

    Meanwhile Dr. Jean Salalima Go provided the rationale for the existence of the Region V Council of GAD Focals. “CHED expects the Council to craft an Action Plan on GAD initiatives for its institutionalization in Higher Education Institutions based on CHED Memorandum No, 1, Series of 2016. Moreover, the Council will serve as organizer and /or coordinating body for GAD-related activities in Region V and identify and share good practices on GAD in terms of school practices, curriculum, research programs and services,” said CHED V Education Specialist II Dr. Go. “The Council will also serve as sounding board of HEIs (to CHED and PCW) relative to GAD issues and concerns and be represented in the Regional GAD (RGADC) currently headed by NEDA V. Dr. Alban and I will extend our utmost support and assistance to the officers and members of the Region V Council of GAD Focals in all your activities,” said Dr. Go.  

    For Higher Educational Institutions, CHED Memorandum Order No. 1 Series of 2015 on “Establishing The Policies and Guidelines on Gender and Development in the Commission on Higher Education and Higher Educational Institutions (HEIs)” provides for enabling mechanisms that CHED and HEIs shall establish, such as the GAD Focal Point System or GFPS, and the integration of the principles of gender quality in the trilogical functions of higher education : (1) curriculum development, (2) gender-responsive research programs, and (3) gender-responsive extension programs.

    In Region V, there are 32 state universities and colleges, 112 private higher education institutions and 18 local universities and colleges which provides tertiary education to 59,723 males and 81,131 females based on CHED data for AY 2017-2018.  In the Bicol Region, there are 3,987 male faculty and 4,468 female faculty, based on CHED’s data for AY 2016-2017.      

    Officers of the Region V Council of GAD Focals were sworn into office by CHED Region V GAD Focal Dr. Ma. Teresa de Alban during the regional meeting attended by over a hundred GAD Focals and Alternates Focals held on July 26, 2018 at the Universidad de Sta. Isabel, Naga City. 

    The Council officers include as Chairperson, Prof. Ma. Elaine I Salazar of Bicol University; Co-Chairperson, Prof. Arnel S. Jardinel of Bicol State College of Applied Sciences and Technology; Secretary, Prof. Karen B. Lladones of UST-Legazpi; and Treasurer, Dr. Leni M. Malabanan of Camarines Sur Polytechnic Colleges.

    The Council’s Board of Directors are Prof. Herminigilda M. Navera of Daraga Community College, Dr. Emmalyn P. Sirios of ACLC College of Iriga City, Dr. Gehana D. Lamug of Camarines Norte State College, Prof. Vivien R. Laborte of Capalonga College, Inc. in Camarines Norte, Dr. Erlinda F. Tabor of Catanduanes State University, Prof. Richard C. Ching of Cataingan Community College in Masbate, Prof. Maria Corazon S. de las Alas of San Pascual Polytechnic College in Masbate, Dr. Led L. Despuig-Encinares of Sorsogon State College and Prof. Felix J. Gaspi of Solis Institute of Technology in Bulan, Sorsogon.

    An output of the convergence meeting was the Council’s constitution and by-laws for submission to SEC. A GAD Training in the three core areas of Gender Sensitivity Training, Gender Analysis and Tools, and GAD Planning and Budgeting has also been scheduled in November 21-23, 2018 in Naga City. It is designed to be a leveling session for the Council officers and their alternate GAD Focals to better provide technical assistance on capacity development and gender mainstreaming for the region.  (MEISalazar)

  • Composition of the BU Committee on Decorum and Investigation (CODI) for Sexual Harassment Cases

  • Gender and Development Focal Point System

    BICOL UNIVERSITY
    GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT FOCAL POINT SYSTEM

    GOVERNING BOARD

    DR. ARNULFO M. MASCARIÑAS
    Chairperson

    1. Issues policies or other directives that support GAD mainstreaming in the policies, plans, programs, projects, and activities, budget, systems, and procedures of the agency including the creation, strengthening, notification or reconstitution of the GFPS;

    2. Approves the GAD plan, program and budget of the agency as duly endorsed by the GAD Focal Point System and ensure its implementation;

    3. Presents to the highest governing board policies, programs and/or recommendations, if so require.

    GAD EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

    DR. AMELIA A. DOROSAN

    Vice- President for Academic Affairs

    ATTY. JOSEPH L. BARTOLATA

    Vice- President for Administration and Finance

    DR. LUIS O. AMANO

     Vice -President for Research Development and Extension

    PROF. JERRY S. BIGORNIA

    Vice-President for Planning and Development

    ATTY. NORLY P. REYES

     Chief Administrative Officer for Administrative Services

    ATTY. LOYD P. CASASIS

    Chief Administrative Officer for Finance

    DR. NOEL R. RAFER

    Director, Center for Gender and Development

    The Executive committee shall:

    1. Provide direction and give policy advice to the University President to support and strengthen the GFPS and the University’s GAD mainstreaming activities.

    2. Direct the identification of GAD strategies, programs, activities and projects based on the results of the gender audit, gender analysis and according to the identified priorities of the University in response to the gender issues faced by its women and men employees, students and clients.

    3. Ensure the timely submission of the University’s GAD Plan and Budget, Accomplishment Report and other GAD-related reports to PCW and DBM;

    4. Ensure the effective and efficient implementation of the University’s GAD programs, activities and projects and the judicious utilization of the GAD Budget;

    5. Build and strengthen the partnership of the University with PCW, GAD experts, advocate, women’s groups and other stakeholders in pursuit of gender mainstreaming;

    6. Recommend approval of University GAD plans and Budgets and GAD ARs; and

    7. Recommend awards or recognition to outstanding institutional GAD programs, activities and projects and/or GAD Focal Point members.

    GAD TECHNICAL WORKING GROUP

    DR. HERBART B. ROSANA

    Dean, Graduate School

    DR. LORNA M. MIÑA

    Dean, College of Education

    DR. MARIA BERNARDITA A. PALACIO

    Dean, College of Nursing

    ATTY. ALEX B. NEPOMUCENO

    Dean, College of Social Sciences & Philosophy

    DR. NOEMI L. IBO, Director

    Jesse M. Robredo Institute of Governance & Development

    DR. EDDIE S. SEE, Dean

    College of Business Economics & Management

    ENGR. AMELIA B. GONZALES

    Dean, College of Engineering

    PROF. DOMINGO LL. NACE

    Dean, College of Agriculture & Forestry

    PROF. JOCELYN E. SERRANO

    Dean, College of Science

    PROF. MARIA GISELA N. MORTEGA

    Dean, Tabaco Campus

    DR. JONATHAN C. ARROCO

    Dean, College of Industrial Technology

    DR. LETECIA M. LOPEZ

    Dean, College of Arts and Letters

    DR. MARY JOY B. CATANGUI

    Dean, Polangui Campus

    DR. LUIS DOMINGO B. MENDOZA

    Dean, College of Medicine

    AR. LEO A. DEL ROSARIO

    Director, Institute of Architecture

    PROF. CARINA L. SALES

    Director, Institute of Physical Education Sports & Recreation

    DR. ROSEMARIE R. JADIE

    Director, Gubat Campus

    PROF. MA. EDEN A. ANTE

    Director, Regional Center for Science & Mathematics Education

    DR. REBECCA ROSARIO O. BERCASIO

    Director, Center for Teaching Excellence

    PROF. RONNEL R. DIONEDA SR.

    Director, Research Development Management Division

    DR. LESTER M. NARVAEZ

    Director Extension Management Division

    DR. BABY BOY BENJAMINE D. NEBRES III

    Dean, Office of Student Affairs and Services Division

    DR. ANALINDA G. MARCELLANA

    Director, University Student Welfare Services Division

    PROF. DAVES L. TONGA

    Director University Student Development Services

    DR. GERARDO O. OCFEMIA

    Director, National Service Training Program

    DR. JENNIFER T. BARRAMEDA

    Supervising Administrative Officer, HRMDO

    ENGR. ULYSSES R. BELLO

    Director, Physical Development and Management Office

    PROF. ALWIN JOSEPH M. MACERES

    Director, Planning Development Office

    MS. CRISANTA A. BOTIN

    University Budget Officer

    ENGR. FERNAN D. DEMATERA

    President, Union of Federated Faculty Association Inc.

    MR. SALVADOR R. BILONO II

    President, Union of Non-Teaching Staff

    MR. VINCE JOSEPH L. VIBAR

    Chair, University Student Council

    The Technical Working Group shall:

    1. Facilitate the implementation of the gender mainstreaming efforts of Bicol University.

    2. Formulate GAD plans, programs and budget of the University in response to the gender gaps and issues face by their women and men employees, students and clients following the conduct of a gender audit, gender analysis, and/or review of sex disaggregated data;

    3. Assist in the capacity development of and provide technical assistance to the University and as needed, to officers in the other offices and units;

    4. Coordinate with the colleges, unit and offices of the University and ensure their meaningful participation in GAD strategic  and annual mainstreaming activities;

    5. Lead the conduct of advocacy activities and the development of IEC materials to ensure critical support of the University officials, staff and relevant stakeholders to the activities of the GAD Point System and GAD mainstreaming activities;

    6. Monitor the implementation of GAD-related programs, activities and projects in their respective colleges, unit, and offices and suggest corrective measures to improve implementation of GAD PAPs and GFPS activities;

    7. Prepare and consolidate agency GAD accomplishment reports;

    8. Provide regular updates and recommendations to the University President or Executive Committee on the activities of the GFPS and the progress of the University GAD mainstreaming activities based on the feedback and reports of the various colleges, units and offices of the University

    SECRETARIAT

    Dr. Noel R. Rafer-Director, BUCGAD, nrrafer@bicol-u.edu.ph

    BUCGAD Staff

    Prof. Gretchen B. Millena – Research and Development Staff, gbmillena@bicol-u.edu.ph

    Ms. Pinky Nodalo – Admin. Staff

    College/Unit GAD Coordinators

    Prof. Roselyn O. Ragas – BUCAF, roragas@bicol-u.edu.ph

    Dr. Mayen B. Buenconsejo – BUCAL, mbbuencosejo@bicol-u.edu.ph

    Prof. Virginia N. Gonzales – BUCBEM, vngonzales@bicol-u.edu.ph

    Dr. Ma. Victoria L. Monte – BUCE, mvmonte@bicol-u.edu.ph

    Prof. Francia Abarientos – BUCENG, flabrientos@bicol-u.edu.ph

    Dr. Rosevida V. Cadag – BUCIT, rvcadag@bicol-u.edu.ph

    Dr. Christina Carmelli A. Brocales – BUCM, ccabrocales@bicol-u.edu.ph

    Prof. Nera A. Galan – BUCN, nagalan@bicol-u.edu.ph

    Ms. Pritzie S. Rey – BUCS,psrey@bicol-u.edu.ph

    Prof. Joselyn M. Niñofranco – BUCSSP, jmninofranco@bicol-u.edu.ph

    Prof. Mercielen R. De Leon – BUGC, mrdeleon@bicol-u.edu.ph

    Prof. April Joy A. Bantog – BUCAF, apriljoyalemania.bantog@bicol-u.edu.ph

    Prof. Grace B. Brizuela – BUTC, gbbrizuela@bicol-u.edu.ph

    Ar. Maureen M. Sia – BU IA, mmsia@bicol-u.edu.ph

    Prof. Sarah Jane B. Labarda – BU IPESR, sjblabarda@bicol-u.edu.ph

    Prof. Eda Salvacion P. Adornado – BU JMRIGD, espadornado@bicol-u.edu.ph

    Prof. Roldan C. Cabiles – BU OU, rccabiles@bicol-u.edu.ph

  • Template for GAD Accomplishment Report

    GAD Accomplishment Report

  • BUCGAD Hosts 26th Family Forum

    Bicol University through the Center for Gender and Development (CGAD) and the College of Industrial Technology (CIT) joined the Region V Inter-Agency Committee (RIAC) to celebrate National Family Week (NFW) through the holding of a Family Forum on September 27, 2018 at the FICC Amphitheater located at the BU East Campus, Legazpi City.

    The Family Forum commemorates 26 years of the National Family Week celebration, held every last week of September, as mandated by Proclamation No. 60, signed by former President Fidel V. Ramos on September 28, 1992.

    The BU Center for Gender and Development also hosted last year’s Family Forum held at the CAL Amphitheater of Bicol University on September 28. The participation of BUCGAD in the Family Week Celebration is part of its advocacy to recognize the vital role of families in building a society where both women and men share responsibilities in the home and enjoy the same rights and access to opportunities and resources in the community.

    This year’s National Family Week theme remains as “Tungo sa Maginhawa, Matatag, at Panatag na Pamilyang Pilipino,” which envisions better initiatives to strengthen the Filipino family in the new generation. National Family Week celebration annually starts on September 23 until September 29.

    The Family Forum invited family advocates from CSOs, and the government. These include Mr. Aser B. Baloloy, Jr. of the Department of Health’s (DOH) Malinao Treatment and Rehabilitation who discussed the implications of addiction recovery for families; Ms. Mayan T. Trilles of the Overseas Workers Welfare Administration (OWWA) on the effect of labor migration on families; and SPO4 Liza Jane C. Alteza, Regional Convenor of the Philippines Against Child Trafficking, who advised the participants on how child safety can be instituted at home and in the community.

    Other resource persons on the family were Atty. Barrameda of the Department of Justice’s (DOJ) Regional Office V, who clarified issues on spousal violence; Ms. Leah D. Dy of the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE) Regional Office V on the ‘Kasambahay Law’; and Ms. Edith Lawenko-Manila, President of the Federation of Senior Citizens Association of the Philippines–LGU Legazpi City, who discussed the issues facing families with aging members.

    The Family Forum was formally opened by Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Region V Director Arnel B. Garcia, followed by BUCGAD Director Ma. Elaine I. Salazar who provided the participants an overview of the forum.

    The BU College of Industrial Technology was ably represented by Dr. Rosevida Cadag who was one of the moderators along with Atty. Flora F. Mangampo-Remolacio of National Police Commission (NAPOLCOM) Region V. The forum’s host was Ms. Nikki Estevez, while the forum coordinator was Ms. Marian Monsalve, both from DSWD.

    Mr. Giobanni Pangan of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saint-Legazpi City, attending as stakeholder representative and BU Vice President for Administration and Finance (VPAF) Dr. Amelia Dorosan formally closed the Family Forum with an invitation to next year’s Family Week Celebration.   

    The Region V Inter-Agency Committee is headed by DSWD Region V and among its members include Bicol University through the Center for Gender and Development, DepEd, PSWD-Sorsogon, SJCM, NAPOLCOM, MARINA, DOST, POPCOM, CHR, DENR, Unbound Legazpi Inc., Mariners Legazpi, NCIP, Southern Luzon Mission, NTC, DOJ, PSWDO Albay, GSH, CIBI, NNC, PSWD Camarines Sur, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints – Legazpi Stake, PSA, PACT, DOLE and NEDA. (MEISALAZAR/BUCGAD)

  • Bicol University creates committee against sexual harassment

    Bicol University created a Committee on Decorum and Investigation (CODI) for Sexual Harassment Cases, a special body to protect students and teaching and non-teaching personnel including contractual and job order workers against sexual harassment.

    Based on the Administrative Order No 543, series of 208 issued by BU President Dr. Arnulfo M. Mascarinas, the special Committee is tasked to receive and investigate sexual harassment complaints and submit reports of its findings based on the prescribed procedure. The prescribed procedure is contained in the University’s Rules and Regulation in Administrative Cases of Sexual Harassment and Similar Offenses. The creation of this special committee is provided in Republic Act 7877 (Anti-Sexual Harassment Act of 1995), CSC Resolution No. 01-0940, and CHED Memorandum No.1, Series of 2015.

    Complaints of sexual harassment sent by electronic mail or through text messaging are considered non-filed unless there is a complaint is in writing, signed by the aggrieved party and notarized. Complaints can be filed with the department head, Dean/Director of the college/unit/office or directly to the CODI Chairperson. If the complaint is sufficient in form and substance, preliminary investigation should begin not later than five (5) days from receipt of the complaint by the CODI. The accused, if proven guilty, would be fined or suspended not exceeding 30 days, or even dismissal or expulsion from work or school depending on the intensity of the offense committed. Sexual harassment can be classified as light, less grave and grave offenses such as that provided by in Rule X of CSC Resolution No. 01-0940 and more detailed by the University of the Philippines’ Anti-Sexual Harassment Code.

    Light offenses include surreptitious looking at a person’s private parts of underclothing, malicious leering or ogling, sexual flirtation or persistent unwanted attention with sexual overtones, inquiries or comments about a person’s sex life and gender orientation, communicating sexist/smutty remarks causing discomfort, embarrassment, offense or insult to the receiver, and display of sexually-offensive pictures, materials, or graffiti.

    Less grave offenses include verbal and/or non-verbal abuse with sexual overtones, including but not limited to, offensive hand and body gestures, derogatory or degrading remarks or innuendos directed toward the opposite or one’s sex, sexual orientation or gender identity, touching or brushing against a victim’s body, pinching that does not fall under grave offenses, and sexual advances or propositions.

    Grave offenses include touching or groping or private parts of the body such as the breasts, genitalia or buttocks, forced kissing, requesting sexual favor in exchange for employment, promotion, local or foreign travels, favorable working conditions or assignments, a passing grade, the granting of honors or scholarships, or the grant of benefits or payment of a stipend or allowance, and attempted or consummated unwanted sexual intercourse or torture of the person in a sexual manner.

    Sexual harassment may take place in the workplace or school, during work or social functions, and at official conferences, fora, symposia or training sessions. It can occur while on official business outside the office or school and by cellular phone, fax machine or electronic mail. Provisions on sexual offenses and their corresponding penalties should be included in collaborative engagements with partner agencies involved in practicum or on-the-job training programs.

    The Bicol University Committee on Decorum and Investigation (CODI) for Sexual Harassment is currently chaired by Prof. Erwin E. Torres. Other members are Dr. Maria Joselyn J. Paje, Mr. Salvador R. Bilono II, Dr. Ana Linda G. Marcellana, Prof. Ma. Elaine I. Salazar and Mr. Brian Mitchel R. de la Rama. The CODI is also mandated to lead discussions and plan for activities to increase awareness and understanding about acts of sexual harassment and how sexual harassment can be prevented in the University. (BUCGAD/MEISALAZAR)

  • Guide in Completing The Gad Accomplishment Report

    CENTER FOR GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT

    Daraga, Albay

    Guide In Completing The Gad Accomplishment Report

    Column 1: Gender Issue/ GAD Mandate

    This column lists the gender issues and/or GAD mandate identified in the previous year’s GAD Plan and Budget (GPB). Gender issues and GAD mandates and commitments that were not previously identified in the GPB but were addressed or implemented by the University shall also be reflected.

    Priority gender issues are those that have been identified through the University’s review of its flagship or regular programs, analysis of sex disaggregated data or relevant information that surface the unequal situation of women and men. These gender issues identified in the previous year’s GAD Plan and Budget can be listed in Column 1.

    The gender issue could be client-organization-focused.  A client-focused gender issue refers to concerns arising from the unequal status of women and men stakeholders of the University including the extent of their disparity over benefits from and contribution to a policy/program and/or project of the University. This arises from not taking into account women’s special needs during the formulation of the University’s policies, planning and implementation of its program, projects and services, putting women in a disadvantaged position.

    On the other hand, an organization-focused gender issue points to the gap/s in the capacity of the organization to integrate a gender dimension in its programs, systems or structure. Example include lack of knowledge and skills of the management and/or employees on GAD, low participation of women or men employees in human resource development undertakings, decision-making structures and processes within the University, sexual harassment and multiple burdens of women employees, among others. A research program, project or study and an infrastructure project can either be client-focused or organization-focused.

    Aside from the priority gender issues, the University may directly cite specific provisions from GAD-related laws or plans (e.g. relevant provisions of the R.A. 9710 or the Magna Carta of Women) that it needs to implement.

    Results of program and project evaluation in terms benefits to target beneficiaries, review of COA audit findings and results of gender analysis and/or assessment using sex -disaggregated data may provide insights to existing gender issues. 

    Column 2. Cause of the Gender issue

    This column lists the causes or reasons for the identified gender issues in the previous year’s GPB. Gender analysis proceeds from identifying the issue (what?) to explaining the issue (why the issue?). It is important to establish the cause(s) of the issue to ensure that the GAD Program or activity will directly address the gender issue leading to its gradual or complete elimination.

    Column 3: GAD Result Statement/ GAD Objective

    This column reflects the results/ objective that the University intended to achieve in relation to the GAD mandates and / or gender issues it committed to address in the previous year’s GPB. It may also be intended outcome of the GAD mandate the University intended to implement (e.g. increased knowledge and skills of the technical staff on GAD planning and budgeting, or improved provision of gender-responsive programs, activities and projects (PAPs) for the clients of the organization).

    The gender issues to be addressed (Column 1); the cause of the gender issue (Column 2), the GAD result statement or objective (Column 3) and the GAD activity (Column 5) should be aligned.

    For uniformity, the GAD objectives should be stated as an infinitive phrase, e.g. To enhance employment and livelihood skills of women, particularly in high-value-adding industries and agricultural activities; To increase women’s awareness of their economic rights and opportunities, etc.

    Column 4: Relevant University MFOs / PAPs

    This column reflects the major final output (MFO) of the University that can be integrated with gender perspective to respond to the gender issues and/or to implement the specific GAD mandate/s identified in Column 1. This ensures that gender perspective is mainstreamed and sustained in the University’s mandate and regular programs.

    MFOs include Training and Education/Instruction, Personnel Services, Extension Services, Research, Library Services, Student Welfare/Services. General Administration and Support Services, Infrastructure Support to Education, etc.

    Column 5: GAD Activities

    This column enumerates the activities or interventions that were undertaken by the University in response to the identified gender issues and GAD mandates. GAD activities that are not included in the endorsed GPB but were implemented by the University may also be reflected.

    Client-focused GAD activities are activities that seek to address the gender issue of the University’s clients or contribute in responding to the gender issues in the education sector and other sectors in which the University is involved. The University’s clients will include its students or those individuals or groups served by its extension service program. 

    Organization-focused activities may seek to: a) create the organizational environment for implementing gender responsive policies, programs and projects; b) address the gap in knowledge, skills and attitudes of key personnel on gender mainstreaming; and c) address the gender issues of employees in the workplace, subject to the mandate of the organization.

    Column 6: Performance Indicators and Targets

    This column indicates the targets identified in the previous GPB which the University committed to achieve within a specific period.

    The Output Performance Indicators are quantitative or qualitative means to measure achievement of the results of the proposed activity and how they contribute to the realization of the GAD objective.

    Quantitative Indicators are measures or evidence that can be counted such as, but not limited to, number, frequency, percentile, and ratio. The number of participants in a seminar should NOT be the only output performance indicator.

    Qualitative indicators are measures of an individual or group’s judgment and/or perception of congruence of established standards, the presence or absence of specific conditions, the quality of something, or the opinion about something (e.g. the client’s opinion of the timeliness of service).

    Columns 1- 6 may just be copied from the previous year’s GPB.

    Column 7: Actual Results

    This column reflects all the results/ outputs of the GAD activities that were compiled or implemented. It shall provide description of the change that has occurred as a result of implementing a particular GAD activity. The results must be stated in quantitative and qualitative terms. It is important to include sex-disaggregated data and gender-related information.

    Column 8: Total College/University Approved Budget

    This column reflects the approved total college/unit/office or university budget.

    Column 9: Actual Cost or Expenditure

    This column shows the actual cost or expenditure in implementing the identified activities of the previous GPB. To avoid double counting and attribution, the college/unit/office shall provide breakdown of the expenditure if necessary.

    Column 10: Variance/ Remarks

    This column shall indicate any deviation from the identified results, activities, and the reasons for the deviation. The factors that have facilitated the implementation of the GAD activity shall also be included.

    Other Essential Information

    Reports of each activity conducted should be attached to the GAD Accomplishment Report to be submitted to the Center for Gender and Development. Reports are narrative, supplemented by photographs of the activity and the clients’ evaluation of the activity.

    Just like the GAD Plan and Budget Report, the GAD Accomplishment Report (GAR) is submitted initially for CHED review via the online system called Gender Mainstreaming Monitoring System (GMMS). The University’s GAR may be returned by CHED for improvement and resubmitted to CHED which if it finds the GPB acceptable forwards it to the Philippine Commission on Women again through the GMMS.

    The GAD Accomplishment Report for the year should accompany the GAD Plan and Budget for the coming year. Both Reports are consolidated by the Center for Gender and Development for the review and approval of the University GAD Focal Point System. The GAD Plan and Budget will not be processed unless it is accompanied by the previous year’s GAD Accomplishment Report.

    Prepared by:

    MA. ELAINE I SALAZAR
    Director, BUCGAD
    April 16, 2019

  • Guide in Completing the GAD Plan and Budget Form

    CENTER FOR GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT

    Daraga, Albay

    Guide in Completing the GAD Plan and Budget Form

    Column 1: Gender Issue and/or GAD Mandate

    The priority gender issues identified through the University’s review of its flagship or regular programs, analysis of sex disaggregated data or relevant information that surface the unequal situation of women and men will be listed in this column.

    The gender issue could be client-organization-focused.  A client-focused gender issue refers to concerns arising from the unequal status of women and men stakeholders of the University including the extent of their disparity over benefits from and contribution to a policy/program and/or project of the University. This arises from not taking into account women’s special needs during the formulation of the University’s policies, planning and implementation of its program, projects and services, putting women in a disadvantaged position.

    On the other hand, an organization-focused gender issue points to the gap/s in the capacity of the organization to integrate a gender dimension in its programs, systems or structure. Example include lack of knowledge and skills of the management and/or employees on GAD, low participation of women or men employees in human resource development undertakings, decision-making structures and processes within the University, sexual harassment and multiple burdens of women employees, among others. A research program, project or study and an infrastructure project can either be client-focused or organization-focused.

    Aside from the priority gender issues, the University may directly cite specific provisions from GAD-related laws or plans (e.g. relevant provisions of the R.A. 9710 or the Magna Carta of Women) that it needs to implement. Results of program and project evaluation in terms benefits to target beneficiaries; review of COA audit findings and GAD ARs to surface remaining gender issues not addressed in previous GPB; and results of gender analysis and/or assessment using sex -disaggregated data may provide insights to existing gender issues.  

    The GAD Focal Point System (GFPS) shall prioritize in the University’s succeeding GAD Plan and Budget (GPB) recurring gender issues, results of the assessment of existing flagship programs using the Harmonized Gender and Development Guidelines (HGDG) and those that have been addressed in the previous year’s GPB.

    Column 2: Cause of the Gender Issue

    Gender analysis proceeds from identifying the issue (what?) to explaining the issue (why the issue?). It is important to establish the cause or causes of the issue to ensure that the GAD Program or activity will directly address the gender issue leading to its gradual or complete elimination.

    Please remember that it may take more than one activity or program to address one gender issue, and some gender issues may take longer than one year to address, hence, some activities may recur or be implemented in a progressive manner until the issue is completely addressed. On the other hand, it is possible that one program may address several gender issues or causes of a gender issue.

    Column 3 and Column 5: GAD Result Statement of GAD Objective and GAD Activity

    Both the GAD objective and the GAD activity should respond to the gender issue including its cause or implement the specific GAD mandates relevant to the University.

    The GAD Result Statement/Objective Column clarifies and spells out the result (outcome) that the University intends to achieve. It may also be intended outcome of the GAD mandate the University intends to implement (e.g. increased knowledge and skills of the technical staff on GAD planning and budgeting, or improved provision of gender-responsive programs, activities and projects (PAPs) for the clients of the organization). The objective must be specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and time-bound. This means setting realistic time-bound quantitative and qualitative targets that signify concrete results of the project’s commitment to gender equality and GAD goals; choosing gender equality and women’s empowerment indicators that will measure the GAD results at output and outcome levels; and requiring the collection of sex-disaggregated data and gender-related information to support the project’s GAD monitoring.

    In addressing a gender issue, it is possible that the GAD objective could not be realized in one planning period. Thus, the University may plan related GAD activities to achieve the same objective over several planning periods until the GAD objective or targeted result is achieve.

    The proposed GAD activity, which can either be client- or organization-focused, should be stated as clearly and specifically as possible to facilitate budgeting.

    Client-focused GAD activities are activities that seek to address the gender issue of the University’s clients or contribute in responding to the gender issues of the sector.

    Organization-focused activities may seek to: a) create the organizational environment for implementing gender responsive policies, programs and projects; b) address the gap in knowledge, skills and attitudes of key personnel on gender mainstreaming; and c) address the gender issues of employees in the workplace, subject to the mandate of the organization.

    The designation of a College GAD Coordinator or even a GAD Committee is an initial step in creating the organizational environment for implementing gender responsive policies, programs and projects. The salary equivalent of the three-unit Work Equivalent Compensation should be included in the College GAD Plan and Budget.

    The gender issues to be addressed (Column 1); the cause of the gender issue (Column 2), the GAD result statement or objective (Column 3) and the proposed GAD activity (Column 5) should be aligned to ensure effective GAD planning and budgeting.

    For uniformity, the GAD objectives should be stated as an infinitive phrase, e.g. To enhance employment and livelihood skills of women, particularly in high-value-adding industries and agricultural activities; To increase women’s awareness of their economic rights and opportunities, etc.

    Column 4: Relevant University MFO/PAP

    This column indicates the major final output of the University that can be integrated with gender perspective to respond to the gender issues and/or implement the specific GAD mandate/s identified in Column 1. This ensures that gender perspective is mainstreamed and sustained in the University’s mandate and regular programs.

    MFOs include Training and Education/Instruction, Personnel Services, Extension Services, Research, Library Services, Student Welfare/Services. General Administration and Support Services, Infrastructure Support to Education, etc.

    Column 6: Output Performance Indicators and Targets

    The Output Performance Indicators are quantitative or qualitative means to measure achievement of the results of the proposed activity and how they contribute to the realization of the GAD objective. For one-year planning, indicators are at the output level to measure the direct results of implementing the GAD Activities.

    Quantitative Indicators are measures or evidence that can be counted such as, but not limited to, number, frequency, percentile, and ratio. The number of participants in a seminar should not be the only output performance indicator.

    Qualitative indicators are measures of an individual or group’s judgment and/or perception of congruence of established standards, the presence or absence of specific conditions, the quality of something, or the opinion about something (e.g. the client’s opinion of the timeliness of service).

    The target is an important consideration in budgeting that specifies what the GAD plan and budget intends to achieve within one year or within the indicated period in relation to the GAD result or objective. The target should be realistic and attainable within the implementation period. Monitoring and evaluating the GAD plan and budget will largely be based on attainment of targets and performance indicators.

    Column 7: GAD Budget

    The GAD budget is the cost of implementing the GAD plan. For more realistic budgeting, the cost of implementing each activity should be estimated by object of expenditure.

    For example, if the University conducts one Gender Sensitivity Training, it should cost the board and lodging (if training is live-in) or food for x number of persons for x number of days, professional fee for resource persons, supplies and materials, travel expenses, communication costs for coordinating the training, among others. It is possible that certain activities do not have direct cost implications.

    The GAD budget may be drawn from the college/unit/office or University’s maintenance and other operating expenses (MOOE), capital outlay (CO), and/or personal services (PS) based on the University’s approved general appropriation. All colleges/units/offices shall allocate at least five percent (5%) of their annual budget appropriation to support their respective GAD PAPs. This “allocation” shall not act as a budget ceiling for GAD PAPs but shall be utilized to influence the remaining 95% of the University’s budget.

    In determining what can be or cannot be charged to the GAD budget, the primary consideration is the gender issue being addressed by the expense or activity. If the gender issue is clear, the expense may be charged to the GAD budget.

    Examples of expense that CAN be charged to the GAD budget:

    1. PAPs included in the PCW-endorsed GAD plan, including relevant expenses such as supplies, travel, food, board and lodging, professional fees among others;
    2. Capacity Development on GAD
    3. Activities related to the establishment and strengthening of enabling mechanisms that support the GAD efforts of agencies (e.g. GAD Focal Point System, Violence Against Women (VAW) desks, among others);
    4. Salaries of College/Unit/Office or University personnel assigned to plan, implement and monitor GAD PAPs on a full-time basis, following government rules in hiring and creating positions;
    5. The College/Unit/Office or University may cost the time spent by GFPS members and of University personnel doing GAD related work (e.g. auditors doing audit of GAD funds) and charge this to the GAD budget. Overtime work rendered in doing GAD related PAPs may be compensated through a compensatory time off (CTO), following government accounting and auditing rules and regulations;
    6. Salaries of police women and men assigned to women’s desk;
    7. University programs to address women’s practical and strategic needs;

    (e.g. day care center, breastfeeding rooms, crisis or counseling rooms for abused women, halfway houses for trafficked women and children,

    1. Gender responsive family planning program among others);
    2. Consultations conducted by the college/unit/office or University to gather inputs for and/or to disseminate the GAD plan and budget;
    3. Payment of professional fees, honoraria and other services for the gender experts or gender specialists engaged by agencies for GAD-related trainings and activities; and
    4. IEC activities (development, printing and dissemination) that support the GAD PAPs and objectives of the University.

    The salary equivalent of the Work Equivalent Compensation (WEC) of the GAD Coordinator may be included in the GAD Plan and Budget of the college/unit/office as a GAD expense.

    The University/College/Unit through the GFPS shall regularly assess or monitor if the GAD budget is being spent for what it was intended for and check on the extent and actual cost of implementing the GAD activities.

    Examples of expenses that CANNOT be charged to the GAD budget:

    1. PAPs that are not in the university/college/unit/office’s PCW-endorsed GAD plan;
    2. Personal services of women employees UNLESS they are working full time or part time on GAD PAPs;
    3. Honoraria for GAD Focal Point System members or other employees working on their University GAD-programs and activities;
    4. Salaries of casual or emergency employees UNLESS they are hired to assist in GAD-related PAPs;
    5. Provision for contingency funds or “other services” of PAPs;
    6. Car-pooling, gas masks for traffic/environment enforcers, among others;
    7. The following expenses may NOT be charged to the GAD budget UNLESS they are justified as clearly addressing a specific gender issue:
    1. Physical, mental and health fitness including purchase of equipment and information dissemination materials;
    2. Social, rest and recreation activities;
    3. Religious activities and implementation of cultural projects; and
    4. Construction expenses
    1. Purchase of supplies, materials, equipment and vehicles for the general use of the University.

    To be able to impute the cost of gender mainstreaming in a flagship or regular program of the university/college/unit/office, it may assess the program or project using the Harmonized GAD Guidelines. The programs or project should be assessed at two levels: 1) the design of the project or program, using the original/ revised design documents; and 2) at the project/program implementation, management and monitoring and evaluation (PIMME). Depending on the HGDG score, the University may use the rating in Table 1 of the JC 2012-01 to estimate the cost that may be attributed to the GAD budget.

    Column 8: Source of the GAD Budget

    This column indicates whether the activities are sourced from the following:

    1. General Appropriation Act (GAA) of the University;
    2. Priority Development Assistance Fund (PDAF) of legislators;
    3. Complementation with LGUs and other government offices;
    4. Official Development Assistance (ODA)
    5. Corporate Operating Budget (COB): and
    6. Partnership with private sector, NGOs, and CSOs, among others.

    Column 9: Responsible Unit/Office

    This column specifies the college, unit or office tasked to implement a particular GAD activity. The responsible unit shall have direct knowledge or involvement in GAD PAPs and shall periodically report the progress of implementing its assigned tasks to the University’s GFPS.

    Other Essential Information

    The GAD activities in particular year’s GPB must be included in the college/unit/office Work and Financial Plan for that year for the approval of the University President for proper fund allocation.

    For effective planning and implementation of GAD PPAs, the essential elements in GAD planning and budgeting should be in place: (a) creation and strengthening of the GFPS; (b) capacity development on gender mainstreaming, gender gender-responsive planning and budgeting, gender analysis and gender assessment; and (c) institutionalization of the GAD database. If these are not present or need to be strengthened, the college/unit/office should include them in the GPB.

    At the college/unit level, the preparation of the both the GAD Plan and Budget and the GAD Accomplishment Report should begin as early as September. By November, the GPB and the GAD Accomplishment Report must be submitted to the Center for Gender and Development for consolidation, review and approval of the University GAD Focal Point System.

    By December, the consolidated GPB should be submitted to CHED Region V Office via the GMMS. The University’s GPB may be returned by CHED for improvement and resubmitted to CHED which if it finds the GPB acceptable forwards it to the Philippine Commission on Women again through the GMMS. PCW usually sets the deadline for the submission of all GAD Reports by January of the next year and may return the reports to the University for improvement.

     Prepared by:

    MA. ELAINE I SALAZAR
    Director, BUCGAD
    April 16, 2019

    Source:

    Office of the President-Philippine Commission on Women, Joint Circular No. 2012-01 from the Philippine Commission on Women, National Economic and Development Authority and the Department of Budget and Management; Guidelines for the Preparation of Annual Gender and Development (GAD) Plans and Budgets and Accomplishment Reports to Implement the Magna Carta of Women, 2013, Annex A, pp. 25-32. URL: http://www.pcw.gov.ph/publication/pcw-neda-dbm-joint-circular-no-2012-01-guidelines -preparation-annual-gad-plans-and-budgets-amd-accomplishment-reports-implementing-magna-carta.

  • CGAD conducts seminar-planning-workshop on gender and development

    Bicol University (BU) – Center for Gender and Development (CGAD) conducts a three-day university-wide GAD seminar-planning-workshop dubbed as Bicol: Building a Gender-Sensitive Academic Community Par Excellence held at the BU Daraga Campus last March 4 to 6, 2020.

    Attended by representatives and CGAD Coordinators from different colleges, campuses, units, and offices of BU, the event commenced with opening remarks from the Vice President for Research, Development, and Extension Dr. Amelia A. Dorosan. CGAD Director Dr. Noel R. Rafer addressed the participants of the activity and presented an orientation on the BU-CGAD Mission, Vision, and Objectives. 

    Afterwards, BU President Arnulfo M. Macariñas delivered a message stating the administration’s support in attaining CGAD’s objective. Similarly, he emphasized the importance of having a common understanding on gender.

    Department Chair of Social Work Dr. Ma. Vida Teresa O. Sales discussed GAD sensitivity during the training followed by a forum on GAD allowable items and activities by the Chief Internal Audit Services Cyrus Barrameda. After the open forum, BU Institute of Architecture (IA) GAD Coordinator Prof. Maureen M. Sia led the GAD training and project checklists.

    The program for the second day commenced with lecture-discussion on GAD issues and its legal mandate from the BU College of Law (CL) Associate Dean and Administrative Officer Atty. Norly P. Reyes. He discussed the 17 Statutory Bases or the Legal Bases of GAD and the Protection of Women and further elaborated on GAD Issues in the Workplace significant to the Administration, Teaching and Non-teaching  Personnel, and students.

    CGAD Director Dr. Rafer led the workshop proper that focused on the preparation and finalization of GAD Plan and Activities for 2020.

    On the last day of the event, participants presented their outputs and suggestions were given based on their presentation. The participants and organizers agreed to share the approved proposals to facilitate the implementation of GAD plans and activities.

    The event concluded with the distribution of certificates led by CGAD Director Dr. Dafer. The three-day event was hosted by Prof. Katherine E. Evasco, Research Coordinator of BU College of Social Sciences and Philosophy (CSSP). (with reports from Dr. Ruby Ann L. Ayo – BUCSSP GAD Coordinator)

  • Contact Us

    Bicol University Gender and Development

    bucgad@bicol-u.edu.ph

  • GAD Mission Vision and Objective

    VISION

    The BU Center for Gender and Development envisions a gender sensitive academic community.

    MISSION

    The BU Center for Gender and Development commits to mainstreaming gender and development in all programs of the university.

    OBJECTIVES

    a. Advocate for awareness and gender mainstreaming on development and

    influence gender and development policies;

    b. Develop and implement plans, programs and activities that will advance the

    GAD perspective across colleges/unit and clienteles of the university;

    c. Disseminate information on gender and development issues and women

    empowerment at all levels;

    d. Initiate the integration of gender concepts in the academic curricula;

    e. Enhance research and extension on gender and development programs and

    projects;

    f. Function as a channel and coordination mechanism for funding of the

    gender and development activities of the university; and

    g. Access fund sourcing windows to finance the conduct of gender and

    development research and extension programs, projects and activities.

  • Be Part Of Center For Gender And Development’s Resource Persons, Community Extensionists, Advocates

    Be Part Of Center For Gender And Development’s Resource Persons, Community Extensionists And Advocates

    You will assist in the implementation of the BUCGAD Strategic Framework and Agenda, and act as RESOURCE PERSONS/TRAINERS & SOCIAL AGENTS within and outside the University, and most especially with its would-be adopted communities.

    This may be counted as part of your community extension activities, on top of your ardent desire and commitment to be of service to the University and its extended communities.

    EXPRESSION OF INTERESTS IS OPEN UNTIL FEBRUARY 19, 2021.

    You may submit your brief CV/Resume, Proposed Program, Projects, Activities (PAPs) and topics that you may serve as trainers at the BU CGAD Office, Room 4 Ground Floor, Social Work Department Building, BU CSSP, Daraga Campus, or at nrrafer@bicol-u.edu.ph and gbmillena@bicol-u.edu.ph. You may also contact 0917-516 8571 and 0915-374 8209 for inquiries.

    THANK YOU!!!

    http://bicol-u.edu.ph/uploaded/Joshua%20Del%20Puso/PDF/BE%20PART.pdf

  • Regional Webinar on the Magna Carta for Women

    The Bicol University Center for Gender and Development warmly invites you to join our Regional Webinar on the Magna Carta for Women (MCW) on November 25, 2021 @1pm as the first of the series of University activities in relation to its 18-Day Campaign vs VAWC.

    We are so honored to have the very person who drafted the MCW as our Resource Speaker, Atty. Maria Cleofe Gettie C. Sandoval, President of SALIGAN, PCW NGRP Pool, and Law Professor, Ateneo de Manila University.

    Registration Link: https://forms.gle/UFnLX5dpvVmeovKM7

    Video Credit: Ms. Gretchen B. Millena, Instructor/CGAD Staff

Contact Us

Telefax No.: (052) 480-0167

Visitors

007296
Users Today : 192
Users Yesterday : 171
Users Last 7 days : 1728
Users Last 30 days : 6406
Users This Month : 6031
Users This Year : 7295
Total Users : 7296

Location

Legazpi City, Albay, Philippines 4500


Bicol University
  • Copyright © 2022. All Rights Reserved.
  •  PandaLogo